An analysis of early china in when china ruled the seas by louise levathes

For thirty years foreign goods, medicines, geographic knowledge, and cultural insights flowed into China at an extraordinary rate, and China extended its sphere of political power and influence throughout the Indian Ocean. There is archaeological evidence that the Yi people traveled as far as South and Central America.

It was not to be. Not only did Zhu Di establish close trade relations with foreign countries, the warships of the fleet were mighty and able to control pirates, settle internal conflicts in foreign nations and keep the Mongols of Northern China at bay.

I wondered if maybe it was the author or the sources or some other unknown factor.

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Zhu Di was with the merchants, and his fleets were veritable mercantile armadas, with boachuan treasure boats feet long. She lives in Washington, D. There was a problem adding your email address.

All in all, however, the book just was not that interesting--which frustrated me, since I thought it should be. Throughout the reading of the book, I kept asking myself the same.

When China Ruled the Seas

Levathes illuminates a historical crossroads: From here they brought back spices, elephants, and the first eyeglasses from Venice.

Levathes writes popular history and therefore sprinkles her text with scene-setting and little digressions into everyday life in Ming China. When I drew my slip, I got "Zheng He". Zhu Di enjoyed a lengthy reign and the treasure fleet ruled the seas during most of it. I would have liked the author to skip past the distant, pre-history of China--or at least summarized the essentials in one, short chapter, and then moved on to the Treasure Fleet, dwelling there for the rest of the book.

Beautifully illustrated and engagingly written, When China Ruled the Seas is the fullest picture yet of the early Ming Dynasty--the last flowering of Chinese culture before the Manchu invasions. Beautifully illustrated and engagingly written, When China Ruled the Seas is the fullest picture yet of the early Ming Dynasty - the last flowering of Chinese culture before the Manchu invasions.

But those things are verdant oases in an otherwise colorless text. A hundred years later, China had no navy and anyone caught even sailing on the high seas was summarily put to death. Zhu Di, therefore, ordered the building of a huge first-class naval fleet which consisted of cargo ships as well as warships.

When China Ruled the Seas : The Treasure Fleet of the Dragon Throne, 1405-1433

Beautifully illustrated and engagingly written, When China Ruled the Seas is the fullest picture yet of the early Ming Dynasty and its extraordinary navy. His successors either ascribed to the Confucians who were against trade or were unsuccessful in their bids to return China to a dominant force on the high seas.

Having established Chinese domination of the Indian Ocean, Zheng seemed to be on the brink of ushering in an era of global Chinese imperialism and openness to the outside world. This could be filled in with accounts from the fleet or from the countries visited or compared with European progress at the time.

Zhu Di died in and was succeeded by his son Gaozhi, a devout Confucian who banned all naval voyages. The eunuchs and merchants wanted trade, exploration, and capital venture; the Confucians wanted moderate taxes, isolation, and priority given to agriculture.

The largest wooden boats ever built, these extraordinary ships were the most technically superior vessels in the world with innovations such as balanced rudders and bulwarked compartments that predated European ships by centuries.

So, to fill in the missing gaps, she added a bunch of pre-history and cultural quirks--many of which had absolutely nothing to do with the era where China ruled the seas. Their principal destination was Calicut in Kerala, the only state that the Chinese did not regard as barbarian.

To give Levathes credit, she does drop interesting tidbits here and there, such as the constant philosophical struggles between the Confucians and the Eunuchs in the royal court and how the personalities of the Chinese rulers controlled the fate of the fleet.

Certainly, they take several chapters worth and destinations are revealed, foreign countries dabbled on, but it feels so empty of actual, researched material.When China Ruled the Seas is an insightful work by Louise Levathes concerning a series of diplomatic trade missions that were dispatched from China across the South China Sea and the Indian Ocean in the early 15th century/5.

When China Ruled the Seas: The Treasure Fleet of the Dragon Throne, by Louise Levathes - Chapter 3, The Prisoner and the Prince summary and analysis. When China Ruled the Seas by Louise Levathes 1. analysis and evaluation of the issues, quality and depth of research, critical and interdisciplinary approach, organisation, structure and adherence to the USP School of Law guide for legal referencing.

in the service of the Ming emperor Yung-lo and commander in chief of the Chinese. When China Ruled The Seas Summary. and Discussion Questions: When China Ruled the Seas by Louise Levathes 1. Why are we reading this book in this class?

0 The reason that we are reading, “When China Ruled the Seas” by Louise Levathes is in order to help us create a better understanding of the Chinese rule and how they became such a great dynasty. In the book, When China Ruled the Seas, Levathes tells us about seven voyages made by junk armadas during the Chinese emperor Zhu Di's reign.

'Treasure ships' as they were called, were under the command of admiral Zheng He, these ships traded silk, porcelain, and many other fine objects of value. billsimas.com: When China Ruled the Seas: The Treasure Fleet of the Dragon Throne, () by Louise Levathes and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great prices/5().

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An analysis of early china in when china ruled the seas by louise levathes
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